Tried to give blood. Was doubly thwarted by my iron. AGAIN. Only two times I’ve ever been turned away.
Oh well. According to the phlebotomist, my iron is in the “healthy” range, but it also happens to be just BARELY too low to donate today.
I blame my uterus.
I just wanted some free Cheez-Its.

Tried to give blood. Was doubly thwarted by my iron. AGAIN. Only two times I’ve ever been turned away.

Oh well. According to the phlebotomist, my iron is in the “healthy” range, but it also happens to be just BARELY too low to donate today.

I blame my uterus.

I just wanted some free Cheez-Its.

OH DEAR!: A Blood Donation Dialogue
Lady:This can't be right.
Me:Huh?
Lady:Your heart rate is really low and somewhat irregular.
Me:I run a bunch, which would explain the low heart rate.
Lady:I'm going to check it again for a full minute.
Me:Okay.
*checks again*
Lady:You have like... 3 slow beats followed by 3 faster beats. Has anyone ever told you that before?
Me:No, but I ran a marathon (#humblebrag) two days ago...
Lady:Hmm... It happened 8 times in a minute.
Me:Should I be freaking out?
Lady:I don't think so... OH. This tells me that less than 10 irregular beats is normal in athletes. I should have asked you that the first time around.
Me:*thinks to self* HEY, YEAH. I'M AN ATHLETE. Also, learn your shit. You scared the crap out of me.
MASSHOLES! (actually: everyone)

Go donate blood. Certain types (mine included) are at emergency levels in the Bay State.

Sadly, I can’t donate for a couple of weeks yet, but I’m scheduled for November 8th. Kate donated recently, and I got a little jelly. :D

Every donation can save up to three lives.

If you care about the fight against cancer but can’t afford to make a donation, this is the perfect way to show your support.

[Why I love donating blood.]

BAM.
That’s why I do it, boo.
Plus, I’m really into the free Cheez-Its.

BAM.

That’s why I do it, boo.

Plus, I’m really into the free Cheez-Its.

Gun Show Thursday: The blood + Guts edition
Keeping it classy.

1 pint.
8:29.
1.88 oz/min.

PR’d by 4:27. Baller.

Gun Show Thursday: The blood + Guts edition

Keeping it classy.

1 pint.

8:29.

1.88 oz/min.

PR’d by 4:27. Baller.

After getting lost and arriving 35 minutes late, I finally got my blood on.
I know Red Cross has some questionable restrictions (the whole European mad cow disease thing, sex with an African, sex with a man who’s had sex with another man [or simply sex with a man if you are a man], being “underweight”, et cetera), but I can’t stress how important donating is if you are able.  Here are some facts about your potential blood donation:
There are four types of transfusable products that can be derived from blood: red cells, platelets, plasma and cryoprecipitate. Typically, two or three of these are produced from a pint of donated whole blood – hence each donation can help save up to three lives.
Every two seconds someone in the U.S. needs blood.
More than 38,000 blood donations are needed every day.
The blood type most often requested by hospitals is Type O.
More than 1 million new people are diagnosed with cancer each year. Many of them will need blood, sometimes daily, during their chemotherapy treatment.
A single car accident victim can require as many as 100 pints of blood.
Type O-negative blood (red cells) can be transfused to patients of all blood types. It is always in great demand and often in short supply.
Type AB-positive plasma can be transfused to patients of all other blood types. AB plasma is also usually in short supply.
I’m AB+, and often people with my blood type don’t see the point in donating (we’re the universal recipient), but it’s incredibly important!  It’s always better to have an exact match, which is especially hard to do with rarer blood types.
If you’ve tried and were turned away or were physically unable, I understand.  But if you’re healthy, fit the Red Cross’s semi-insane requirements, and have never tried before, what’s holding you back?  For most people, it’s a quick and painless process, though I admit to being tortured by a rogue needle and have passed out at the snack table.  And look! I’m still here.  No lasting harm, no foul.
Okay, off of my soapbox now. :)

1 pint.
12:56.
1.24 oz/min.

Slow runner, slow bleeder.

After getting lost and arriving 35 minutes late, I finally got my blood on.

I know Red Cross has some questionable restrictions (the whole European mad cow disease thing, sex with an African, sex with a man who’s had sex with another man [or simply sex with a man if you are a man], being “underweight”, et cetera), but I can’t stress how important donating is if you are able.  Here are some facts about your potential blood donation:

  • There are four types of transfusable products that can be derived from blood: red cells, platelets, plasma and cryoprecipitate. Typically, two or three of these are produced from a pint of donated whole blood – hence each donation can help save up to three lives.
  • Every two seconds someone in the U.S. needs blood.
  • More than 38,000 blood donations are needed every day.
  • The blood type most often requested by hospitals is Type O.
  • More than 1 million new people are diagnosed with cancer each year. Many of them will need blood, sometimes daily, during their chemotherapy treatment.
  • A single car accident victim can require as many as 100 pints of blood.
  • Type O-negative blood (red cells) can be transfused to patients of all blood types. It is always in great demand and often in short supply.
  • Type AB-positive plasma can be transfused to patients of all other blood types. AB plasma is also usually in short supply.

I’m AB+, and often people with my blood type don’t see the point in donating (we’re the universal recipient), but it’s incredibly important!  It’s always better to have an exact match, which is especially hard to do with rarer blood types.

If you’ve tried and were turned away or were physically unable, I understand.  But if you’re healthy, fit the Red Cross’s semi-insane requirements, and have never tried before, what’s holding you back?  For most people, it’s a quick and painless process, though I admit to being tortured by a rogue needle and have passed out at the snack table.  And look! I’m still here.  No lasting harm, no foul.

Okay, off of my soapbox now. :)

1 pint.

12:56.

1.24 oz/min.

Slow runner, slow bleeder.

It’s been 2 months and 2 days since my last blood donation.

That means that I am ~1 week overdue.  THE HORROR!

Off to donate blood like a champ.

When was the last time you donated?

"You have a beautiful blood type."

Why, thank you, Ms. Needle Sticker!

Just donated blood, so I’m feeling like a champ.

Run slow, bleed slow - that’s my motto for life.  Running slow is just how I roll - can’t help it at the moment.  Bleeding slow may mean more time on the table, but it also means that in event that I suffer a severe laceration or puncture wound, I won’t bleed out in 2 seconds!

Another memorable Ms. Needle Sticker quote: “Oh, you’re a squirter.

Gosh, you know how to make a girl blush.